19 -20 September, 2017| Geneva, Switzerland

Conference Day

8:00 am - 9:00 am REGISTRATION AND COFFEE

9:00 am - 9:10 am CHAIRMAN'S OPENING REMARKS

9:10 am - 9:40 am WELCOMING ADDRESS FROM THE MINISTER: PLACING THE THREAT FROM CIVILIAN DRONES WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF GENEVA’S SECURITY POLICY

Mr Pierre Maudet - State Counsellor, Department for Security and Economy, Republic and Canton of Geneva
  • The vision and strategy of the canton of Geneva (the Governmental Global Policy – June 2017)
  • Deliberating the opportunities and threats that civilian drones pose to Geneva’s security. Challenges for regulation and technology
  • Placing drones within the context of Geneva’s security policy and developing resilience to the misuse of drones

Mr Pierre Maudet

State Counsellor, Department for Security and Economy
Republic and Canton of Geneva

9:20 am - 9:40 am GENEVA AIRPORT AND DRONES : CURRENT SITUATION - CHALLENGES AND EXPECTATIONS

Mr André Schneider - Chief Executive Officer, Geneva Airport

Mr André Schneider

Chief Executive Officer
Geneva Airport

  • Analysis of the threat by purpose built terror drones 
  • Limitations of today’s systems relying on the electronic spectrum 
  • Using military grade air defence technology for drone defence
  • Rheinmetall’s drone defence tool box for all missions and users

Mr Fabian Ochsner

Vice President, Business Development and Marketing
Rheinmetall Air Defence and Radar Systems

  • Understanding how existing airspace regulation needs to be updated to support the regular deployment of counter-drone capability
  • Which technologies will be the most difficult to incorporate within an updated C-UAV regulatory framework?
  • Establishing accountability for C-UAV strategy and capability. Limiting liability and risk for infrastructure owners and law enforcement operators
  • To what extent must the C-UAV regulation governing airports differ from that controlling the airspace over and around other secure sites?
  • How can improved regulation cope with both the accidental and intentional misuse of civilian-controlled RPAs?

Mr Peter Alty

Agency RPAS Manager
EUROCONTROL & JARUS

Mr Markus Farner

Manager, Innovation and Advanced Technologies
Federal Office for Civil Aviation, Switzerland

10:50 am - 11:30 am MORNING COFFEE AND NETWORKING

  • A case study of Geneva’s recent tactical deployment of jamming technology to protect both a stadium (Swiss Cup final - May 2017) and the visit at the UN in Geneva of a VVIP, who made a state visit in Bern and went to the WEF (Davos). Devising rules of engagement that allow for the safe use of jammers in congested civilian environments
  • Introducing the strategy of Switzerland’s national C-UAV Working Group of the Police Forces, and understanding how that strategy will encourage the deployment of, among others, C-UAV capability at a national level
  • Delivering a C-UAV policy that leaves room for law enforcement’s own use of drones, and which sufficiently supports the priorities of Chiefs of Police in Switzerland

Lieutenant Colonel Peter Brander

Chief of Staff of the Cantonal Crisis Management & Representative of the Swiss National Working Group of the Police forces, C-UAV
Department of Security and Economy, Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva

12:00 pm - 12:40 pm TECHNOLOGY PANEL: INTRODUCING COUNTER-DRONE TECHNOLOGIES AND DISCUSSING THEIR DEPLOYMENT IN A CONGESTED CIVILIAN ENVIRONMENT

Professor Garik Markarian - Principal Invesitgator, EU FP7 Project Lancaster University
  • What are the foremost solutions for countering civilian drones, and to what extent must legislation be updated to regulate their procurement and deployment?
  • Of the currently available commercial counter-drone solutions, which are most realistically deployable in a congested civilian environment?
  • Assessing the relative merits of kinetic versus passive counter-drone solutions. Beyond deterrence and towards engagement
  • How can available counter-drone solutions be merged with existing security systems to safely identify and engage civilian-piloted UAVs?

Professor Garik Markarian

Principal Invesitgator, EU FP7 Project
Lancaster University

12:40 pm - 1:10 pm SECURING THE AIRPORT PERIMETER BY AUGMENTING DETECTION CAPABILITY

Ms. Sabina Lajdová - Aviation Security Specialist, Prague Airport
  • Understanding the challenge of small-platform detection in a congested airport environment. Enhancing Prague Airport’s ability to track targets once they enter the perimeter
  • How is Prague Airport updating its existing radar systems to maximise awareness of its air space? Utilising RF detectors to support drone detection
  • What capabilities will the Airport deploy to engage drones? How can drones be safely disabled without risk to public safety?
  • Should international airports invest in radar systems that are multi-function, and which support longer range ATC as well as short range perimeter detection? Alternatively, are separate and bespoke solutions better-equipped to identify small airborne platforms?

Ms. Sabina Lajdová

Aviation Security Specialist
Prague Airport

1:10 pm - 2:20 pm NETWORKING LUNCH

2:20 pm - 2:50 pm ENHANCING AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT TO SUPPORT A EUROPE-WIDE ANSWER TO THE DRONE PROBLEM

Mr Peter Alty - Agency RPAS Manager, EUROCONTROL & JARUS
  • Developing Europe’s existing ATM system to deal with the proliferation of civilian-operated drones. Establishing safe conduct across the international airspace
  • Centralising the ATM network to support a coordinated approach to the drone threat
  • How will the SESAR 2020 project enhance the detection of small airborne platforms, and how can common processes be established to ensure a legal and effective response?

Mr Peter Alty

Agency RPAS Manager
EUROCONTROL & JARUS

  • How are security personnel within airports and airlines currently preparing to combat the threat from civilian-operated drones? How do they develop risk assessments that incorporate the misuse of RPAs?
  • Which counter-drone technologies are of greatest interest to airport security officers? How can airports work with industry to develop solutions that are realistically deployable?
  • Establishing clear requirements for an airport-based C-UAV system. Determining optimal detection ranges, reaction times and reaction types
  • Analysing the risk of a drone-led terrorist attack. To what extent should the danger from RPAs be incorporated within an airport’s broader counter-terror policy?
  • If drone engagement remains legally complex, how can airports maximise their ability to detect drones within their airspace? Are commercially available radar systems sufficient to deliver the precise detection of small airborne platforms?
  • If counter-drone technology is to be deployed, who should pay for it – the Airport or the national CAA?

Mr PP Singh

Head of Safety & Vice Chair, World Safety and Technical Committee
New Delhi International Airport/Airports Council International

Mr Nathan Wall

Airside Safety Lead
Cork Airport

Ms. Sabina Lajdová

Aviation Security Specialist
Prague Airport

3:30 pm - 4:10 pm AFTERNOON TEA AND NETWORKING

4:10 pm - 4:50 pm LAW ENFORCEMENT PANEL: UPDAPTING COUNTER-TERROR STRATEGIES TO ENCOMPASS THE THREAT FROM DRONES

  • How might drones be exploited as a vector for terrorism, and how imminent is that threat?
  • Exploring how a broader counter-terror strategy could and should be developed to include drones. Are deployable counter-terror capabilities ready to respond to a drone-led assault on public infrastructure?
  • How are law enforcement agencies developing contingency strategy and training to prepare for a deliberate drone-enabled attack?
  • Exploiting intelligence on counter-drone operators to better oversee their proliferation

4:50 pm - 6:10 pm ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS: DEALING WITH DRONES BEYOND THE AIRPORT

Responsibilities for Operators, Regulators & Manufacturers

Scenario
A drone enters a stadium during an international sporting fixture, and the pilot cannot be immediately identified. Authorities are unsure whether the drone poses a deliberate threat, and disabling it could put both the players on the pitch and the attending public at risk. For the purposes of the exercise, security personnel and local law enforcement have access to a full-spectrum of kinetic C-UAS capability.

Objectives
This roundtable will examine the existing disconnect between available C-UAS technology and the incomplete regulatory framework that legitimates its use. Conference attendees will have the flexibility to move between each discussion, and will analyse how infrastructure-owners can prepare themselves to prevent drone-incursion whilst complying with the law and minimising public injury.

4:50 pm - 6:10 pm ROUNDTABLE A: THE OPERATOR - DEVELOPING A SECURITY STRATEGY THAT INCORPORATES C-UAV CAPABILITY

  • If a drone were to enter the immediate airspace around a stadium, would security personnel be trained and equipped to respond?
  • Would an adequate risk assessment already be in place, and would it promote a sufficiently rapid response?
  • Assuming that C-UAV technology was readily available, which capabilities would be the safest to use?
  • Could the drone be disabled without further endangering attendees?

4:50 pm - 6:10 pm ROUNDTABLE B: REGULATING THE AIRSPACE AROUND MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE

  • Who would be responsible for maintaining airspace security around a major public installation?
  • Should the stadium be charged with deploying counter-drone capability, or would local law-enforcement be better-placed to enforce C-UAV strategy?
  • If more extensive C-UAV regulation is not readily forthcoming, could public installations secure permission to deploy counter-drone technology on a short-term basis?

4:50 pm - 6:10 pm ROUNDTABLE C: DEVELOPING DRONE PLATFORMS THAT MITIGATE RISK

  • To what extent does responsibility for mitigating the drone threat rest with UAV manufacturers?
  • How can fail-safe technology be built into commercially available drones, in a manner that balances commercial opportunity with public security?
  • Assessing the merits of a “kill-switch” for drones, which would guarantee that law enforcement could force them to land safely or return home when the drone posed a risk
  • How can the drone industry better cooperate with aviation regulators and security personnel to improve safety and mitigate the risk of disaster?
  • How do drone manufacturers currently view the regulatory landscape, and do existing laws provide sufficient guidance for them to minimise the use of drones for intentional attack, rather than accidental mishap?

4:50 pm - 6:10 pm ROUNDTABLE D: ESTABLISHING LIABILITY AND AVOIDING LITIGATION

  • Assuming that local regulation did not prohibit the deployment of C-UAV capability, could the stadium owner invest in an insurance package that adequately covered the threat from and the engagement of civilian-operated drones?
  • If disabling a UAV were to result in accident or injury, how could an infrastructure owner avoid the impact of litigation?
  • What safeguards and processes would need to be installed to qualify for a cost-effective insurance package?

6:10 pm - 6:20 pm THE LEADERS OF EACH ROUNDTABLE REPORT KEY FINDINGS BACK TO THE AUDIENCE

6:20 pm - 6:20 pm END OF CONFERENCE DAY